Agency Threatens To Shut Down Casinos If They Host Motorcycle Clubs!

In a raging case of motorcycle profiling, the South Dakota Commission on Gaming has issued scathing warnings to “gaming establishments” (a.k.a. casinos) to not host motorcycle clubs. Not only is this an order against bikers, but also against these business owners. And nobody’s really doing anything about this! The authorities have always been acting against the bikers, and the businesses are too afraid to take on these shady agents of Uncle Sam.

 

What’s worse is that the agencies are making it look like it’s a decision of these establishments.

 

The truth is that these establishments are being strong-armed into this, and it’s a gross violation of biker’s First Amendment rights, as well as the establishments’ right to trade. In February, law enforcement requested the South Dakota Commission on Gaming to ensure that bikers weren’t allowed to wear their colors. This was around the time when the Hells Angels were planning their Annual National Run in Deadwood City.

 

The Cadillac Jacks Resort had won the bid to host the event.

 

The Resort had even entered into an agreement with the Hells Angels to host their event. That’s when Craig Sparrow, the Director of Enforcement at SDCG, threatened the resort with disciplinary action in an email. He used an arbitrarily-worded law to prohibit the resort from hosting the club unless they wanted their gaming license revoked.

 

Later, in a perfect illusion of choice, the SDCG sought suggestions from the industry on their interactions with the one-percenters.

 

Members of the hospitality and gaming industry responded to the SDCG, saying,

“We believe that the best path forward to keep Deadwood safe is for each individual property to have their security and management teams work with the city of Deadwood and its safety officials on proper safety planning that takes their unique properties into consideration. We do not believe there is a ‘one solution fits all’ approach that would be effective overall.”

 

While the industry is looking at the criminal elements in individual clubs as individual criminals, the SDCG is keen on discriminating against the clubs as a whole.

 

Dennis McFarlnad, the Gaming Commissioner, said that he “agrees” with the industry. But that’s all where he agrees at, in words. He added that the commission would take a dim view if any problem arises at a casino, and “one percenters are there are start the problem”. The commission has now asked for list of DGA member-casinos that are going to disallow colors during the Sturgis Rally in August. What do you think about this scathing discrimination? Let us know in the comments section below.

Motorcycle Club vs Biker Gang: What’s the Difference?

To the outside world, the two may seem like the same, but they really aren’t. Not every “motorcycle club” is a “biker gang”, and it’s high time people realize that. It’s high time bikers realize this themselves if they want to continue living the lifestyle they love so much. It’s absolutely cool to be a “motorcycle club”. But, I wouldn’t say the same for a “biker gang”.

 

 

In simple terms, a motorcycle club, is a group of people all of whom ride. And unlike a Riding Club, these guys don’t just ride together, they’re pretty much family to each other. Being part of a motorcycle club is like being part of a sacred brotherhood. It goes much beyond just riding and motorcycles. It’s a lifestyle.

 

Most Motorcycle Clubs in the country are registered with the American Motorcyclist Association.

 

AMA likes to call any motorcycle club that’s not registered with them as an “outlaw motorcycle club”. That’s not to mean that these “unregistered clubs” are doing anything illegal. They’re just not registered with this organization, which isn’t even a governmental organization.

 

Then, there are the OMGs.

 

Or as the U.S. Department of Justice likes to call them, “one-percenter outlaw motorcycle gangs”. According to the DOJ, these are essentially organized criminal syndicates in the form of a motorcycle club. There’s a whole long story to how the term “one-percenter” came into being. But, that’s a story for another time. Today, we’re here to urge you to watch this video from Insane Throttle that talks about the difference between a “motorcycle club” and a “biker gang”. It’s really important that you understand it, so that you can explain it to the people outside the biking community. Please DO give it a watch, and let us know what you think about it in the comments section below.

14-Year Old Kills Biker While Driving Wrong Side And The Authorities Are Not Sure Whom To Charge!

There’s a lot on the roads that can kill bikers. Inattentive drivers, drunk drivers, stupid pedestrians, road obstacles, stray animals, and whatnot. Of all these things, there’s one class of people I really didn’t expect to be on the list. But seems like, I was wrong. The new entry on the list is ‘little kids behind the wheel’. Today’s story is just about the same.

 

Thanks to parents who can’t keep a watch on their kids, hundreds of riders are losing their lives.

 

Today we’re reporting the sad demise of Dusty Duet and Robert Stafford. The two cousins were traveling on Robert’s Harley-Davidson motorcycle through Highway 74 in Louisiana. The two were returning home from a casino on early Monday morning when Robert saw a 2017 Nissan Versa approaching him in the wrong direction.

 

Robert tried to avoid the car, but couldn’t.

 

The car crashed into Robert’s motorcycle head-on in a horrific crash. Although none of the parties involved in the accident were under influence, the driver of the car certainly shouldn’t have had been driving. And that’s because he was a child of fourteen. He obviously wasn’t trained or mature enough to ride a car on the road.

 

As investigations are on into the matter, the DA’s office is looking into what charges can be filed and pursued.

 

It’s a clear case of manslaughter, but due to the young age of the perpetrator, he may just escape the consequences of his actions, which he otherwise would have had faced. It’s still not clear why the teen was driving, or whose car it was, or why he was on the wrong side.

Hells Angels MC turns 70 years old

Founded in 1948, the hells angels motorcycle club has been a pop-culture mainstay for decades.

Books, television and movies have mythologized them endlessly.

The story began on March 17, 1948, in San Bernardino, California, and the name is most-commonly attributed to the Howard Hughes movie of the same name, about World War II bombers. But that is where the military connection ends.

The hells angels website refutes the commonly held story that the group was founded by ex-military misfits and outcasts. Of course, later on, members from various branches of the military would join HAMC but it was not a military club to begin with.

The group’s logo, the Death Head, is easily one of the most recognizable brands of the 20th century. It’s since been copyrighted in the United States and internationally.

The “Berdoo” chapter is still alive and well to this day. That group’s 70th anniversary party is scheduled for this weekend. There are no chapters listed in Texas.

More clubs began popping up soon after in and around California. In 1957 Sonny Barger founded the Oakland chapter. He would end up becoming the face of the club in pop-culture, and to this day remains a cult figure.

Barger’s autobiography, “Hell’s Angel,” was released in 2001 to wide acclaim by motorcycle fans and others interested in the biker subculture.

By 1961 the club had a chapter in Auckland, New Zealand, and by the end of the decade the first of many chapters was founded in Europe. Australia, Africa and Brazil were still to come. Today there are even clubs in Turkey.

Nomad Dave shows off his Hells Angels tattoo as he attends a Hells Angels rally.

In 1965 LIFE magazine went on the road with the outlaw bikers for a series of photos featuring the group riding and interacting with polite society. Two years later Hunter S. Thompson wrote the non-fiction book “Hell’s Angels” about his time riding with the club.

They maintain an allure within mainstream culture, with TV shows like “Sons of Anarchy” adding to the mystique. Barger himself appeared on the show a handful of times. The motorcycle club in the TV show is purely fictional, although it does have some elements of the biker culture.

Deadly encounters between the Angels and other clubs have kept them squarely outside the lines, and the actions of bad apples among them haven’t helped matters.

Awesome Moment When Crowd Lifted a Burning Car To Save Biker’s Life!

These days, it’s hard to go over the news any day and not come across stories that show sides of people we wish never existed. Whether it’s stories about rape, murders, or road rage, it’s time like today, when we need things to restore our faith in humanity. And today, we have got just the right story for that.

 

Nobody cared who the biker was. All they cared about was him!

 

We don’t have a lot of details surrounding the incident. It’s not clear where the incident took place, or how the accident happened. However, what we can see is that a car, presumably a BMW 5 Series, and a motorcycle have met a horrible accident.

 

The motorcycle is in flames.

 

And there’s smoke coming from under the car. The car’s occupants or the motorcycle rider are nowhere to be seen. And that’s when one of the passersby sees that motorcyclist is trapped under the burning car.

 

And within seconds, a crowd gathers.

 

But this isn’t the kind of crowd that would stand and watch there as a man burned to his death. They were the kind who decided to risk their own lives to save another life.

 

All of them gather on one side of the car, and begin to lift the car.

 

In a striking show of solidarity and the strength of unity, they were able to lift the heavy sedan at least 2 feet in the air. That’s when one of these good samaritans pulled out the motorcyclist from under the car.

 

 

The rider lay in an unconscious state. We’re not sure what happened next, but we’re just too overwhelmed with this!

Motorcyclist Rider Left With Horrific 3rd-Degree Burns After Driver Flicks Cigarette Out Window

24-year old Caleb Dunn was on a routine ride on his motorcycle in Florida when he felt something odd.

All of a sudden, his skin felt burning hot!

He was in so much pain that he had never been in before! He wasn’t even to keep his hands on his handlebar. Apparently, his hoodie had caught fire!

And how?

Because some smoking idiot in a car had flicked his cigarette butt out of the window, which made contact with Dunn’s hoodie and lit a fire!

Dunn, however, handled things rather bravely!

He somehow kept his hands on the handlebars and parked the bike by the side of the road. He removed his hoodie and brushed off of whatever was left.

Horrified bystanders immediately called 911!

Dunn was then airlifted to the nearby University of South Alabama Medical Center Trauma Center. Roughly about 25% of his body’s skin suffered third-degree burns! His skin around his armpits, about half of his chest, part of his stomach, and the whole of his back was completely obliterated!

Doctors have treated the affected area with a temporary artificial skin for now.

Once his body rejects this artificial skin, they will begin skin grafting. It’s a long road to complete recovery. He’s likely to spend about 6 months in the hospital!

So, the next time you’re driving and feel the need to smoke, pull over to the side and have it!

This way you can also have both your hands on the steering when driving. And if you just HAVE to smoke while driving, make sure you don’t just flick it out the window. Keep an ashtray, use a glass, a bottle, a zipper, or whatever. And if you’re not even going to do that, at least don’t send your cigarette butts flying out the window. Roll down your windows completely. Take your hand out and place it as down below as you can, and seek to gently “drop” the cigarette! Share this with everybody you know so they know how dangerous it can be for somebody when they flick their cigarette butts out the window!

UNIONS TO HARLEY-DAVIDSON: OUR PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS ARE OVER

MILWAUKEE — Two labor unions that represent most of the production employees at Harley-Davidson say they’ve terminated an agreement with the company aimed at fostering collaboration and joint decisions on a wide range of issues.

The United Steelworkers and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers say ending the agreement, which was in place for 22 years, sends a message that relations with Milwaukee-based Harley have soured.

“It has become apparent to me that for the last seven years Harley-Davidson has been, and continues to, systematically dismantle its hourly workforce through various means,” said Robert Martinez Jr., president of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Employees are still covered under the current union contracts, and nothing in those contracts has changed, yet the written collaboration agreement was important, according to Martinez.

“It worked well for many years. But Harley-Davidson has changed their direction on the way they’ve communicated with, and dealt with, our leadership teams in the plants,” he said.

“Harley would just unilaterally make decisions on what they were going to do,” without the unions’ endorsement, he added.

Harley-Davidson spokeswoman Patricia Sweeney said the unions’ decision to pull out of the agreement won’t change the company’s approach to dealing with workplace issues.

“We will continue to work very closely with (the unions) to resolve issues, to address challenges, and to make improvements that are really important in helping move the business forward. And just as importantly we remain committed to working with the international union leadership as well,” Sweeney said.

In May, Harley-Davidson upset the unions when it announced plans to operate a motorcycle assembly plant in thailand.

The company said the plant, scheduled to open in 2018, wouldn’t result in any U.S. job losses and that it would assemble bikes from components produced at U.S. factories.

However, union officials argued it would take work from the United States and that it was one of multiple steps the company had taken to weaken its unionized workforce.

“Building motorcycles abroad is a slap in the face to every one of our members. We find it appalling that the company continues to dismantle what we built up for all these years,” Martinez said.

The thailand plant is necessary, Sweeney said, as Asia is one of Harley’s fastest-growing markets and the Thailand tariff on motorcycles assembled in the U.S. is about 60%.

The growth overseas comes as the U.S. motorcycle market has been in sharp decline, and analysts say the outlook isn’t very promising.

“We have been working very hard to reverse the declining trend, but we have also had to make difficult adjustments that impact many employees in the U.S.,” Sweeney said about layoffs and furloughs at the plants here.

Union officials cited job losses and the use of seasonal, temporary employees in the motorcycle factories as two of their top concerns.

“When we had 2,000 members in York, Pa., in 2010, and today there are only 600, there’s a problem,” Martinez said.

Temporary furloughs are expected at the plants this fall, including the Menomonee Falls, Wis., factory that employs about 1,000 production workers. The company also is eliminating about 180 production jobs, with the Menomonee Falls and Kansas City locations expected to be hit the hardest.

“Certainly it’s been tough on our union employees, given the number of layoffs that we’ve had and down days. And we recognize that has had a significant personal and financial impact on them,” Sweeney said.

The company needs to grow its way out of the slump, according to Sweeney.

“We believe that if we can bring new riders into the sport, here in the U.S. and internationally, that is going to result in company growth. And that growth is the only path to reverse the conditions we have been facing over the last couple of years,” she said.

Union leaders said they met with Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich on Monday.

Levatich agreed to work with them to resolve staffing issues, according to the unions.

“I guess we will just have to wait and see what happens and what he means,” said Steelworkers spokesman Wayne Ranick.

“Things aren’t working like they have in the past. … This partnership has broken down,” Ranick said.

Motorcycle Accidents Reportedly Cost $16 Billion to the Government!

Motorcycle accidents are both a scary and a sad thought for us bikers. The attributed that make motorcycling a really great thing to do also make it pretty unsafe. And it’s this vulnerability and inherent lack of safety in riding that bikers sustain much higher injuries in any crash.

In fact, you’re as per official data, the risk of death in case of a motorcycle accident is about 30 times higher than that in case of a car crash! With all the stupid and inattentive drives on the road and the gazillion other things that can kill us, I really don’t find the stat hard to believe.

Today, we have some stats from the Government Accountability Office that shed light on the cost of motorcycle accidents. In a year, about 82,000 riders were reported to be injured in a motorcycle accident. And about 4,500 were killed in motorcycle crashes.

The combined total cost of all these accidents was pegged to be about $16 billion! Crashes in which the rider died costed about $1.2mn on an average. And crashes where riders just sustained injuries costed between $2,500 and $1.4mn. The huge variation in this figure is because of the varying cost of medical expenses as a result of the varying magnitude of injuries.

Centre For Disease Control gave another interesting number. Apparently, the use of helmets in all the motorcycle accidents combined saved the economy a whopping $3bn! This is because helmets cut the chances of fatality by as much as 39%, according to the NHTSA.

LABOR UNIONS END PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Two labor unions that represent most of the production employees at Harley-Davidson Inc. say they’ve terminated an agreement with the company that had fostered collaboration and joint decisions on a wide range of issues.

The United Steelworkers and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers say ending the agreement, which was in place for 22 years, sends a message that relations with Milwaukee-based Harley have soured.

“It has become apparent to me that for the last seven years Harley-Davidson has been, and continues to, systematically dismantle its hourly workforce through various means,” said Robert Martinez Jr., president of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Employees are still covered under the current union contracts, and nothing in those contracts has changed, yet the written collaboration agreement was important, according to Martinez.

“It worked well for many years. But Harley-Davidson has changed their direction on the way they’ve communicated with, and dealt with, our leadership teams in the plants,” he said.

“Harley would just unilaterally make decisions on what they were going to do,” without the unions’ endorsement, he added.

Harley-Davidson spokeswoman Patricia Sweeney said the unions’ decision to pull out of the agreement won’t change the company’s approach to dealing with workplace issues.

“We will continue to work very closely with (the unions) to resolve issues, to address challenges, and to make improvements that are really important in helping move the business forward. And just as importantly we remain committed to working with the international union leadership as well,” Sweeney said.

In May, Harley-Davidson upset the unions when it announced plans to operate a motorcycle assembly plant in thailand.

The company said the plant, scheduled to open in 2018, wouldn’t result in any U.S. job losses and that it would assemble bikes from components produced at U.S. facilities.

However, union officials argued it would take work from the United States and that it was one of multiple steps the company had taken to weaken its unionized workforce.

“Building motorcycles abroad is a slap in the face to every one of our members. We find it appalling that the company continues to dismantle what we built up for all these years,” Martinez said.

The thailand plant is necessary, Sweeney said, as Asia is one of Harley’s fastest-growing markets and the Thailand tariff on motorcycles assembled in the U.S. is about 60%.

The growth overseas comes as the U.S. motorcycle market has been in sharp decline, and analysts say the outlook isn’t very promising.

“We have been working very hard to reverse the declining trend, but we have also had to make difficult adjustments that impact many employees in the U.S.,” Sweeney said about layoffs and furloughs at the plants here.

Union officials cited job losses and the use of seasonal, temporary employees in the motorcycle factories as two of their top concerns.

“When we had 2,000 members in York, Pa., in 2010, and today there are only 600, there’s a problem,” Martinez said.

Temporary furloughs are expected at the plants this fall, including the Menomonee Falls factory that employs about 1,000 production workers. The company also is eliminating about 180 production jobs, with the Menomonee Falls and Kansas City locations expected to be hit the hardest.

“Certainly it’s been tough on our union employees, given the number of layoffs that we’ve had and down days. And we recognize that has had a significant personal and financial impact on them,” Sweeney said.

The company needs to grow its way out of the slump, according to Sweeney.

“We believe that if we can bring new riders into the sport, here in the U.S. and internationally, that is going to result in company growth. And that growth is the only path to reverse the conditions we have been facing over the last couple of years,” she said.

Union leaders said they met with Harley-Davidson CEO Matt Levatich on Monday.

Levatich agreed to work with them to resolve staffing issues, according to the unions.

“I guess we will just have to wait and see what happens and what he means,” said Steelworkers spokesman Wayne Ranick.

“Things aren’t working like they have in the past. … This partnership has broken down,” Ranick said.

Until now, union leaders said, the partnership was helpful in settling workplace issues that otherwise could have escalated.

“The intent was to be interactive, and not just in solving problems but also in things like production improvements and to really encourage people to step up and talk about how to make things better,” Ranick said.

The unions say they’re willing to reinstate the agreement if the company addresses issues such as job security.

“Both unions strongly believe that seniority has to count for something when it comes to job security, instead of leaving it to management discretion alone,” Martinez said.

The use of temporary, seasonal employees also needs to be resolved, according to union leaders.

“There is no way I will put this agreement back in place until then,” Martinez said.

CHECK OUT IF YOU MEET THE HELLS ANGELS MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS

The membership requirements, at least officially, for the Hells Angels MC as well as almost all other one percenter motorcycle clubs are relatively straight forward.

We could start off this article by saying that the Hells Angels Membership Requirements included needing to do 12 drug deals, commit 1 murder and then bludgeon 4 baby harp seals …but then we would be lying, that’s not how to become a Hells Angel.

Below is what you want to know if you one day wish to be on the list of the famous Hells Angels members.

1.The Personality

We can safely start with saying that if you are interested in joining the Hells Angels MC, the Outlaws MC, the Bandidos MC or any other one percenter motorcycle club for that matter  and you are really on Google to tell you how to do it, then you probably won’t be joining them any time soon. The first in the list of Hells Angels membership requirements is to have the right personality. You will have similar interests and therefore probably also friends in common. People with similar interests usually gravitate.

2.The Harley Davidson Motorcycle

An important step if you want to learn how to join the Hells Angels, then the next in the list of Hells Angels membership requirements is a motorcycle, but not just any motorcycle. It should be a Harley Davidson motorcycle, however some other makes including Buell motorcycle (which is owned by Harley Davidson) may also be acceptable. In general, any of the major one percenter motorcycle clubs will not allow non-American motorcycles. Some of the reasoning behind this links back to the period when many of the clubs were started, World War II was fresh on the mind and supporting the enemy nations was not high on the list of priorities. Riding American made bikes shows strong patriotism.

3.You Will Ride Often

Next in the list of Hells Angels membership requirements is that you will need to ride, a lot. Don’t even think about buying a Harley Davidson fresh from the showroom floor, parking it out the front of a clubhouse and thinking that means you are a biker. Clubs including the Hells Angels MC go pretty much everywhere by motorcycle, they aren’t just the toy that comes out on the weekend if the sun has come out.

You will be expected to live on your Harley Davidson, riding across cities and states on your way to meets and as your primary form of transport, if you want to know how to become a Hells Angel then you need to be a dedicated Harley Davidson rider.

Importantly though, this shouldn’t sound like a chore. This should be the only way that you want to travel. If you don’t love this idea, then this lifestyle is not for you.

4.The Club Comes First, This is Your New Life

A fully patched member will have voting rights, of which they are expected to utilise. The Hells Angels MC has a number of meets throughout the year and it is expected that all members should attend whenever possible. If you start missing several of these meets then questions will be ask about your dedication to the club.

It is easy enough to read this article about Hells Angels membership requirements and have an understanding of what is required, but actually following through and practically dedicating your life to the club is another thing completely. You must be absolutely passionate about the lifestyle, there will not be much free time for other activities outside of the club, so hold off on signing up at the yacht club.

5.How To Leave Hells Angels: You Don’t Leave

Once last point to close out this article about Hells Angels membership requirements, is that you can’t leave the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club easily. It’s much easier to complete the steps of how to join the Hells Angels than it is to leave without having major problems.

Committing to join the club should be thought of as a life commitment. If you do try and escape the club then you must hand your patches back, or they may be taken by force.

The exception to this rule is in the case where members have provided several loyal years of service with the club, they may be allowed a graceful exit and in some cases after enough time may even be allowed to keep some of their patches.

The Hells Angels MC shouldn’t be seen as a club you will try out for a while and see how it goes for you with the option to then drop out.

Hells Angels Race Requirements

Historically the Hells Angels race requirements have seen them as a predominantly whites only outlaw motorcycle club, however over the decades this stance has loosened slightly, especially for chapters outside of the USA.

Within the United States it is extremely unlikely that you will ever see a black American Hells Angels member, although within the USA there are patched members of others origins including Hispanic and Native Americans. Having said that, many chapters within America will still party with, and do business, with black Americans, it is just that they will not be patched as an Angel.

If you look internationally to some of the European Hells Angels Charters there are looser Hells Angels race requirements for entry and evidence of black members, as well as a mix of many races.

The Phases of Membership

  1. The Hang-around: Being a hang-around is the first stage, where you have probably been invited by other members of the club to an event, possibly at a Hells Angels clubhouse. This will provide you with an opportunity to meet some of the other members and get a feel for what this lifestyle may have to offer you. The other Hells Angels MC members will also be judging your character along the way.
  2. The Associate: The next step up from the Hang-around is the Associate, where you will spend up to a few more years attending some of the events and meeting other members. The members will continue to evaluate you as you learn the ropes of how to become a Hells Angel.

1. The Prospect: Once you are made a prospect you are allowed to attend a lot more events, however you will not be able to place any votes on club matters and there may also be some meetings that you are not allowed to attend. It is over this period that the members will determine whether or not they believe that you will be a suitable fully patched member in the future.
2. The Fully Patched Member: The final step in the process will see you made into a Fully Patched Member. You will only reach this stage after a vote, where you must receive a unanimous vote from the other Hells Angels MC members. It is the several years of evaluations during the recruitment process which will determine whether or not you receive the votes required. In addition to the voting there may also be other requirements made of the Prospect in order to become a fully patched member, however due to the secrecy of all of these clubs it can’t be confirmed.

Successfully complete all of the above steps and you are well on your way to becoming a one percenter, you now know how to become a Hells Angel.

Source: http://www.onepercenterbikers.com